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News Release | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

UT Faculty Urge University Lands to Reduce Methane Pollution

AUSTIN – Faculty of the University of Texas System released a letter today urging UT Chancellor McRaven to reduce the climate-damaging methane emissions occurring at oil and gas facilities on land managed by the UT System. The letter has more than 177 faculty signatures and ran as an ad in the Wednesday edition of UT Austin’s student newspaper, The Daily Texan. “UT wants us to be leaders for our students,” said David Matiella of UT San Antonio’s Department of Architecture. The professors who signed onto this letter want UT to step up and be a leader on managing our public lands.”

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Blog Post

2016 air pollution data for Texas | Luke Metzger

Today we released Our Health at Risk: Why Are Millions of Americans Still Breathing Unhealthy Air?, which examines air pollution data for 2015. We also obtained preliminary data from the EPA for 2016 (the data will officially be considered final on May 1, but we expect few if any changes). So how did Texas metro areas stack up? In general, air pollution improved in Texas in 2016, with a few exceptions. There were more smoggy days in Houston and more sooty days in El Paso, Brownsville and McAllen (increases italicized below).

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Report | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Our Health At Risk

Despite decades of progress under the Clean Air Act, Americans across the country continue to breathe unhealthy air, leading to increased risk of premature death, asthma attacks and other adverse health impacts.

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News Release | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Solar increases by a third in Houston in 2016

AUSTIN -  Solar capacity in Houston increased by 33 percent in 2016, according to a new report released today by Environment Texas Research & Policy Center. “By using solar power, we can reduce pollution and improve public health for everyday Texans,” said Luke Metzger, Director of Environment Texas. “To realize these benefits, city leaders should continue to embrace a big vision for solar on rooftops throughout the community.”

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Report | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Shining Cities 2017

Solar power grew at a record-breaking pace in 2016. The United States now has 42 gigawatts (GW) of solar photovoltaic (PV) energy capacity, enough to power 8.3 million homes and reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 52.3 million metric tons annually.1 Hundreds of thousands of Americans, especially in our cities, have invested in their own solar panels or solar projects in their communities and millions more are ready to join them.

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