News Releases

News Release | Environment Texas

San Antonio ranks 7th in nation for solar power

SAN ANTONIO – San Antonio has more solar panels than most major American cities, ranking 7th among dozens of metropolitan areas analyzed in a new report. San Antonio’s berth in the “solar sweet sixteen,” just behind Indianapolis and ahead of Denver, was owed primarily to smart contracts between the municipally owned utility, CPS Energy, and solar companies to build multiple solar farms totaling 400 MW, or enough to power over 31,000 homes, once completed.

News Release | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Texas’ Biggest Polluters Spending Millions to Pollute Politics

AUSTIN – BASF Corporation spent $2.8 million on lobbying in a single year, according to a new report by Environment Texas. The enormous spending came after their Freeport, Texas facility dumped 2.1 million pounds of toxic chemicals into Texas’ waterways in 2012. 

News Release | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

New website evaluates environmental impact of projects in State Water Plan

AUSTIN – Environment Texas Research and Policy Center launched a new website today designed to help educate Texans about the environmental impacts of projects in the State Water Plan. The interactive website – www.OurTexasWater.org - allows Texans to view a map of the state and learn about highlighted projects in their community. The new website comes as the Texas Water Development Board considers the first round of applications for funding from the new water infrastructure fund approved by voters in November 2013. 

News Release | Environment Texas

Report: wind energy could reduce pollution by 36 fossil fuel plants

The carbon pollution from 36 coal and gas fired power plants could be eliminated in Texas if wind power continues its recent growth trajectory, according to a new analysis by Environment Texas

News Release | Environment Texas

EPA proposes plan to reduce air pollution in Big Bend National Park

AUSTIN - Today, Environment Texas applauded a proposal by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to reduce air pollution in Big Bend and Guadalupe Mountains National Parks. EPA's action, required by the Clean Air Act, will reduce the haze that has impaired visibility in some of Texas' most loved parks. The proposal comes after EPA determined a haze plan submitted by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) - in which views at Big Bend would be obscured until the year 2155 - "did not adequately address" certain legal requirements. Eight Texas power plants will be required to install pollution controls to reduce sulfur dioxide emissions by a total of 230,000 tons per year.   

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