Environment Texas Research and Policy Center Latest Blog Posts

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Andrea McGimsey
Senior Director, Global Warming Solutions Campaign

When Oxford Dictionaries chooses “climate emergency” as the word of the year for 2019, you know things are changing. Our children are inheriting a world vastly different and more dangerous than the one we grew up in, and we need to act on climate now. 

When Oxford Dictionaries chooses “climate emergency” as the word of the year for 2019, you know things are changing. Our children are inheriting a world vastly different and more dangerous than the one we grew up in, and we need to act on climate now. 

Yet as world leaders meet in Madrid this week to discuss progress towards cutting global warming pollution and hitting the targets of the historic international Paris Agreement, President Trump has vowed to pull our country out. 

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Emma Pabst
Global Warming Solutions Advocate

Looking at this proposed policy amendment and its effects, I come to one definitive conclusion: deregulation is dangerous. Deregulation will undermine the strength and spirit of the Clean Air Act. Deregulation will damage vital efforts to combat greenhouse gas emissions. Deregulation will dump tens of thousands of tons of methane and hazardous pollutants into the air we breathe; and deregulation will deny young and old alike of a state of health and environment they can never get back. 

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Michaela Morris
Associate, Protect Our Oceans, Environment America

The video provides visceral imagery of the suffering caused by single-use plastic. Marine animals, like this turtle, ...do not deserve to suffer extraordinary pain because of the vast quantities of disposable plastic products that end up in the sea. 

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Luke Metzger
Executive Director

A week and a half ago hundreds of Austin students walked out of school to join with millions of people across the planet to demand urgent action to tackle the climate crisis and help preserve a livable planet for their futures. We must heed their call. Transportation is this country’s number one source of climate change pollution. Greenhouse gas emissions from vehicles surpasses every other source. We can’t solve global warming without changing how Americans get around.

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Emma Pabst
Global Warming Solutions Advocate

On Thursday I hosted a press conference about our new report on illegal air pollution in San Antonio, and I had to wake up at the unholy hour of… 6am. Okay, so, I know I’ve made it through worse, but 6am?! I can barely manage to make breakfast at that hour, let alone pull together the materials for an entire press conference.

Earlier this month, a group of legislators from both coasts signed onto a wave of eight bills in Congress aimed at blocking the Trump administration’s offshore drilling plan.

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Emma Pabst
Global Warming Solutions Advocate

This past weekend I stood outside of Austin High School, waiting for guests to arrive to our tour of the schools’ rooftop solar installation. I hung our “Go Solar” banner on the closest railing I could find, pulled out the small stack of nametags I’d brought, and looked out over a parking lot packed full of cars that belonged to students and parents attending athletic practices that morning.

(By Jennifer Walker and Sharlene Leurig) Austin's new 100-year water plan uses an innovative strategy called integrated water resource management (also known as One Water), which looks at all sources of water — including nontraditional sources like rainwater, storm water, and wastewater — as possible resources to meet community needs. Water Forward is also the first water supply plan in Texas to incorporate climate change into its future projections.

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Luke Metzger
Executive Director

On Nov. 19, Environment Texas joined with Care2.com and the Surfrider Foundation to deliver 53,000 petitions and a letter from conservation leaders to Whataburger's HQ in San Antonio and restaurants in Austin and Corpus Christi. The petitions and letter asked Whataburger to stop its use of polystyrene cups and containers. Polystyrene, commonly known as styrofoam, is one of the worst and most common types of plastic. 70 million plastic foam cups are estimated to be disposed by Americans every day. Most of the waste will spend hundreds and thousands of years sitting in landfills. About one third ends up in the environment, especially our rivers, lakes, and oceans.

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Emma Pabst
Global Warming Solutions Advocate

As a US government report on climate change warned last Friday, we don’t have time to wait. For every ton of carbon pollution we release into the atmosphere, we increase the frequency and intensity of wildfires, hurricanes, and droughts. But this issue is so much more than environmental - it’s common sense finance. That’s why we’re calling on Austin ISD to install solar on every school in the district by 2025, and we’ve drafted a resolution that says exactly that.