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Report | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Illegal Air Pollution in Texas, 2020

A recession across the oil, gas, and petrochemical industries caused in part by the COVID19 pandemic led to a decline in production. This pandemic-driven slowdown in production caused a drop in unauthorized emissions in 2020, according to a report by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality.  Preliminary 2021 industry emissions reports indicate that the pollution drop is likely to be short lived unless state and federal regulators ramp up environmental enforcement and eliminate pollution loopholes.

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News Release | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Interior Dept to lease Gulf of Mexico for offshore wind

Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland announced today plans to deploy 30 gigawatts (GW) of offshore wind energy by 2030, including in the Gulf of Mexico. A newly released leasing schedule projects that the Interior Department will decide on an area of the Gulf to lease by early 2022, with a lease sale by the end of that year. 

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News Release | Environment Texas

New report: Austin experienced 103 days of polluted air in 2020

AUSTIN, TEXAS–  The Austin-Round Rock-Georgetown metro area, home to 2.2 million people, suffered through 103 days of elevated air pollution in 2020, according to a new report from Environment Texas Research & Policy Center, Frontier Group and TexPIRG Education Fund. Statistics from 2020 represent the most recent data available. Air pollution causes 17,000 deaths every year in Texas.

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News Release | Environment Texas

Statement: Federal regulators make wrong decision in allowing new nuclear waste site in Texas

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approved a private company’s plan Monday to store nuclear waste in the Permian Basin of West Texas. 

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News Release | Environment Texas

STATEMENT: Tropical Storm Nicholas bears down on Texas

AUSTIN, Texas -- For the sixth time in the past three months, a tropical storm or a hurricane is aiming for the now-waterlogged United States’ Gulf Coast. Tropical Storm Nicholas, which is poised to make landfall sometime Monday, would be the first to directly strike Texas in 2021. While Nicholas is unlikely to achieve hurricane status, the National Hurricane Center is warning those in its path of the potential for “life-threatening inundation” by storm surge, with as much as 20 inches of rainfall in some areas causing both that surge and flash flooding. As we saw when Hurricane Ida reached land two weeks ago, these powerful storms can lead to both power outages and industrial accidents. Like Tropical Storm Mindy last week, Nicholas developed close to the Gulf shore, leaving little time for the operators of oil, gas and other dangerous facilities to prepare for the worst. In response, Environment Texas Executive Director Luke Metzger released the following statement:

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