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News Release | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Houston solar capacity nearly doubled from 2019 to 2021

HOUSTON- Houston ranked sixteenth in the nation for total installed solar photovoltaic (PV) capacity in the eighth edition of Environment Texas Research & Policy Center’s report Shining Cities: The Top U.S. Cities for Solar Energy. The report, which is the most comprehensive survey available of installed solar capacity in major U.S. cities, found that Houston nearly doubled its total solar capacity between the end of 2019 and the end of 2021. The city is now home to 81.4 megawatts of solar capacity total, which comes out to about 35 watts per person.

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News Release | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

New report recommends cities look beyond renewable energy credits to meet climate goals

Renewable energy credits (RECs), commonly used to help cities, counties, businesses and institutions meet their commitments to adopt renewable energy, have played a critical role in making renewable energy more affordable and economical, spurring the growth of wind and solar energy. But a new white paper released Monday from Environment Texas Research & Policy Center and Frontier Group argues that while REC purchases on open markets can be an important piece of local governments’ efforts to reduce emissions and increase sustainability, they are unlikely to be sufficient in and of themselves to support the transition to 100% renewable electricity.

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Blog Post

The Clean Energy Home Series (Part 3): What are Electric and Induction Cooktops? | Brynn Furey

The third blog in a series on how to electrify your home and transition to appliances that can run on renewable energy

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News Release | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

New report outlines how electric school buses could speed Texas’s transition to a clean, reliable electric grid

AUSTIN -- As early as next month, billions of new federal dollars will start to become available for school districts across the country to transition to clean, electric school buses. Today, most of the nation’s nearly half a million school buses run on diesel fuel, producing harmful emissions that children are forced to breathe. With the support of the World Resources Institute’s Electric School Bus Initiative, Environment Texas Research and Policy Center, Texas Public Interest Research Group, and Frontier Group are releasing a new report examining how the transition to electric school buses, in addition to keeping diesel exhaust out of developing lungs, could help speed up the expansion of clean energy by providing a critical source of reliable battery storage. 

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