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News Release | Environment Texas

One of Texas' dirtiest power plants to close

AUSTIN - Citing the poor economics of coal, Texas electric generator Luminant announced this morning plans to retire its 1800 MW Monticello coal burning power plant in January. The forty year old Monticello plant, at peak production one of Texas’ most polluting power plants, had run intermittently in recent years as the plant became less competitive with cleaner generation on the Texas electric grid.

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Report | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Lead testing results

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Report | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Raw Sewage Released by Hurricane Harvey

Reports indicate that flooding caused by Hurricane Harvey spilled at least 31 million gallons of raw sewage in Texas, but likely spilled far more.1 That’s the equivalent of every person in Houston flushing a toilet seven times.* This pollution threatens human health.

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Report | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Dealing with Debris From Hurricane Harvey

The floodwaters of Hurricane Harvey have receded, but the work to clean up in the storm’s aftermath has just begun. One thing left in Harvey’s wake is a tremendous amount of debris -- people’s belongings and furniture, parts of buildings, trees, and boats destroyed during the hurricane

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News Release | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

71% of Texas schools test positive for lead in drinking water

AUSTIN – 779 Texas schools have found lead in their drinking water, according to an analysis of testing data by Environment Texas. The analysis, an update of one completed in March, includes hundreds of additional tests from Austin, Houston, Humble, Alief, Garland and Northwest Independent School Districts. Environment Texas also offered a new toolkit to help parents, teachers, and administrators Get the Lead Out of schools’ drinking water.  Citing a lack of accurate information on lead contamination in water and how schools should prevent it, Environment Texas encouraged parents and teachers to put the new toolkit on their “back to school” reading list.

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