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Report | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Texas Stormwater Scorecard

Rain is one of Texas’s greatest resources, but it also causes some of our most serious problems. Too much produces flooding and erosion, too little produces droughts and aquifer depletion, and dirty runoff produces water pollution. These problems are becoming worse as more of the state’s land is covered with buildings and roads that prevent rain from soaking into the ground where it falls. That’s why more Texans are using building and landscaping features that can retain and reuse stormwater onsite.

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News Release | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Ten years of progress positions Texas to take renewable energy to the next level

AUSTIN - Since 2007, Texas has seen a 21,466% increase in the amount of electricity it gets from the sun and a 639% increase in wind power production, according to a new report released today by Environment Texas Research & Policy Center. The report also highlights Texas’ leadership in the use of energy storage and electric vehicles, but finds Texas ranked 47th for improvements in electricity energy efficiency programs. 

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Report | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Renewables on the Rise

Clean energy is sweeping across America, and is poised for further dramatic growth in the years ahead.

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News Release | Environment Texas and Environmental Integrity Project

Texas fails to penalize 97 percent of illegal air pollution releases

Texas imposed penalties on less than 3 percent of illegal air pollution releases during industrial malfunctions and maintenance from 2011 through 2016, even though these incidents emitted more than 500 million pounds of pollutants, according to an analysis of state records by the Environmental Integrity Project and Environment Texas. A new report, “Breakdowns in Enforcement,” ranks the worst illegal air pollution events from oil refineries, chemical plants and other industrial facilities across Texas in 2016. The report concludes that the infrequency and small size of the state’s fines (averaging just three pennies per pound for pollution) are a major problem, because the lack of enforcement means that the owners are less likely to invest money to upgrade and repair known problems.

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Report | Environment Texas and Environmental Integrity Project

Breakdowns in Enforcement

A review of five years of state records by the Environmental Integrity Project and Environment Texas shows that the state imposed penalties on less than 3 percent of the illegal pollution releases (588 out of 24,839) reported by companies during maintenance or malfunctions from 2011 through 2016, even though the incidents released more than 500 million pounds of air pollution.

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