All Issues

Protecting Forests

To protect species and biodiversity, we must protect the world’s forests. Doing so will help stabilize our climate. We’re doing our part by engaging the American public and urging U.S. companies to choose sustainability. For instance, we’re urging Cargill and other U.S. agricultural companies operating in the tropics to adopt zero-deforestation plans, and we’re urging U.S. tissue companies to include recycled paper products in their paper towels, toilet paper and tissues.

Protect the Boreal Forest

Circling the Northern hemisphere in a ring of spruce, firs and pines, the boreal forest is the most carbon-rich ecosystem on Earth. In Canada, the boreal forest covers more than 1 billion acres — making it the largest intact forest remaining on our planet. The Canadian boreal forest is a refuge for such species as caribou, cougars and grizzly bears, whose habitats have dwindled further south. Billions of birds, nearly half of all avian species in North America, breed in the boreal before flying southward into our backyards and parks each winter.

Offshore Wind for America

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No Bees, No Food

Millions of bees are dying off, with alarming consequences for our environment and our food supply. We rely on bees to pollinate everything from almonds to strawberries to the alfalfa used to feed dairy cows. What happens if the bees disappear? It’s simple: No bees, no food.

New Life for the Ocean

Natural Cities, Healthy Waters

Our waterways are special here in Texas, but unfortunately, runoff pollution threatens our water. The concrete jungle of development prevents rainwater from soaking into the ground, forcing it to run over roofs and roads, picking up oil, toxic chemicals, litter and animal waste. When this polluted water reaches our waterways it makes us sick and threatens the habitat of our wildlife.

More Nature

Every minute, America is losing two football fields worth of forest, meadow, grassland, desert, beachfront, riverside or wetland. Today, just 13 percent of oceans worldwide can be classified as "wilderness" relatively unaffected by human activity.

This continuous loss of nature diminishes not only the richness of our natural world, but also of our own lives and that of our children’s future.

Methane Gas Leaks

Green Scissors

Go Solar

Fortunately, more Americans are going solar every day. By 2017, our country had enough solar energy capacity installed to power the equivalent of more than 10 million homes.

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