Conservation America

National parks are places of curiosity and awe. If you’ve ever been to one, surely you’ll agree we need to keep protecting these treasures.

This year marks the 100th anniversary of one of America’s best ideas: the National Park Service, which manages everything from the iconic Grand Canyon to the beautiful Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

Credit: Grand Canyon National Park via Flickr, CC BY 2.0

America’s national parks should be protected, not shortchanged

Our parks, forests and public lands are a big part of what makes this country so great. They’re where we go to spend time outdoors with our families and friends, to hike, bike, fish and see wild animals.

Credit: Grand Canyon National Park via Flickr, CC BY 2.0

Yet instead of helping to protect and preserve our parks and other special places for our kids and future generations, some leaders in Congress have other ideas.

Some members of Congress are exerting their influence to convince the administration to mine for uranium right outside the Grand Canyon and drill for oil and gas near the Everglades.

Credit: ENERGY.GOV via Flickr, Public Domain

Mining and drilling are both wildly polluting, and would threaten the wildlife that call the Grand Canyon and the Everglades home — and they go against the very idea of protecting our most special places.

While it’s bad enough our parks are under threat and getting shortchanged on funding, some in Congress are actually trying to sell off our parks to the highest bidder.

Together, we can protect the Grand Canyon, the Everglades and other national parks for generations to come, so that our children can experience the same wonder that we have.

Credit: Mike Peters/Shutterstock

A legacy we can all be proud of                                                                      

We are banding together to stop these threats so that on the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service, we can make a commitment to preserve these special places for kids growing up today.

Your support makes it possible for our staff to conduct research, make our case to the media, reach out to critical constituencies, and persuade our leaders to make the right choices.

Credit: fredlyfish4 via Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA 4.0

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