Conservation America

National parks are places of curiosity and awe. If you’ve ever been to one, surely you’ll agree we need to keep protecting these treasures.

This year marks the 100th anniversary of one of America’s best ideas: the National Park Service, which manages everything from the iconic Grand Canyon to the beautiful Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

Credit: Grand Canyon National Park via Flickr, CC BY 2.0

America’s national parks should be protected, not shortchanged

Our parks, forests and public lands are a big part of what makes this country so great. They’re where we go to spend time outdoors with our families and friends, to hike, bike, fish and see wild animals.

Credit: Grand Canyon National Park via Flickr, CC BY 2.0

Yet instead of helping to protect and preserve our parks and other special places for our kids and future generations, some leaders in Congress have other ideas.

Some members of Congress are exerting their influence to convince the administration to mine for uranium right outside the Grand Canyon and drill for oil and gas near the Everglades.

Credit: ENERGY.GOV via Flickr, Public Domain

Mining and drilling are both wildly polluting, and would threaten the wildlife that call the Grand Canyon and the Everglades home — and they go against the very idea of protecting our most special places.

While it’s bad enough our parks are under threat and getting shortchanged on funding, some in Congress are actually trying to sell off our parks to the highest bidder.

Together, we can protect the Grand Canyon, the Everglades and other national parks for generations to come, so that our children can experience the same wonder that we have.

Credit: Mike Peters/Shutterstock

A legacy we can all be proud of                                                                      

We are banding together to stop these threats so that on the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service, we can make a commitment to preserve these special places for kids growing up today.

Your support makes it possible for our staff to conduct research, make our case to the media, reach out to critical constituencies, and persuade our leaders to make the right choices.

Credit: fredlyfish4 via Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA 4.0

Issue updates

News Release | Environment Texas Research & Policy Center

Christmas Mountains to be Transferred to Texas State University System

AUSTIN - Land Commissioner Jerry Patterson announced today intentions to transfer the Christmas Mountains to the Texas State University system. This would make the land an "outdoor classroom, open to all — including hunters — with conservation of the land guaranteed forever."

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News Release | Environment Texas

Environment Texas Releases 2011 Legislative Scorecard

Twenty-six representatives and two senators voted to protect the environment 100% of the time in the 82nd Legislature, according to Environment Texas’ biennial legislative scorecard. Meanwhile, three Representatives and one Senator failed to cast a single pro-environment vote. The scorecard tracks votes on a range of votes affecting the state’s air, water, natural areas, and quality of life.

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News Release | Environment Texas

The Aransas Project Passes Critical Stage in Endangered Species Act Litigation to Protect Whooping Crane

Today, in the federal Endangered Species Act (ESA) litigation brought by The Aransas Project (TAP) against officials of the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ), United States District Judge Janis Jack ruled from the bench to deny all motions to dismiss the litigation.
The Aransas-Wood Buffalo flock of Whooping Cranes that winters on the Texas coast is the only natural wild flock remaining in the world. The flock has increased from 16 birds in the early 1940s to a high of 270 in the spring of 2008. The 2008-2009 year was the worst in recent history for the Whooping Crane, with a death toll of 23 birds, or 8.5% of the flock, occurring in Texas during their winter at Aransas. The lack of freshwater inflows to the bays from the Guadalupe and San Antonio Rivers, especially during times of low flows, resulted in very high salinity levels and depleted food and water sources for the Cranes.

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News Release | Environment Texas

Environment Texas Releases Congressional Scorecard

Representatives Eddie Bernice Johnson and Henry Cuellar of the Texas Congressional delegation voted for the environment 100% of the time in the past year and a half, according to the annual Congressional Scorecard on major environmental issues released today by Environment Texas. Senators Kay Bailey Hutchison and John Cornyn and Representatives Randy Neugebauer and Pete Olson took the anti-environment position on every vote that Environment Texas tracked, earning them the appellation “natural disasters”.

“Representatives Johnson and Cuellar have consistently voted to put the environment ahead of special interests.  In the past year and a half they successfully fought to invest an unprecedented $80 billion in clean energy and to increase funding for our national parks,” said Metzger. “These scorecards are an important tool to educate the public about the voting records of their elected officials and to honor public officials like this that have a record of putting the environment first.”

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Report | Environment Texas

Preserving America's Natural Heritage

 America’s open spaces are an integral part of our national identity. Our natural landscapes not only provide us with places of great beauty, but they also play a critical role in providing habitat for wildlife along with clean water, fresh air and recreational opportunities for Americans.

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