Reports

Report | Environment Texas

Building for a Clean Energy Future

Texas can reduce its dependence on dirty, dangerous and expensive fossil fuels by adopting new, high performance home designs. Using energy-efficient technology and smallscale solar energy systems, homes can be built to generate as much energy as they use, achieving “net-zero energy” performance.

Report | Environment Texas

The Clean Energy Future Starts Here: Understanding the American Clean Energy and Securty Act

America’s dependence on fossil fuels wreaks havoc on our environment and is a drag on our economy. With a new president committed to tackling our energy challenges – and with the momentum generated by a decade of clean energy innovation at the state level – Congress has taken up the task of mapping out a new energy future for the nation.

Report | Environment Texas

Preserving America's Natural Heritage

 America’s open spaces are an integral part of our national identity. Our natural landscapes not only provide us with places of great beauty, but they also play a critical role in providing habitat for wildlife along with clean water, fresh air and recreational opportunities for Americans.

Report | Environment Texas

The High Cost of Fossil Fuels: Why America Can’t Afford to Depend on Dirty Energy

America is at an energy crossroad. As a nation, we are dependent on fossil fuels at a time of growing demand and dwindling supply. Meanwhile, fossil fuel use continues to impose massive environmental and economic costs. Now our country must choose between paying to continue the status quo and investing in a new energy future.

Report | Environment Texas

Hotter Fields, Lower Yields

America’s reliance on fossil fuels – coal, oil, and natural gas – is fueling global warming and causing a host of other environmental, economic, and security problems.

And while the impacts vary from region to region, global warming threatens all sectors of our economy, and agriculture is no exception.
Not all the effects of global warming will be bad for agriculture; growing seasons will be longer, and increased carbon dioxide levels encourage plant growth. But global warming will make some of the challenges that agriculture faces significantly worse, including increasing temperatures, more damaging storms, ozone pollution, and spreading pests, weeds, and diseases.
This report examines the impact of global warming on corn, America’s largest crop, which is particularly vulnerable to productivity losses from the higher temperatures expected from global warming.

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