Reports

Report | Environment Texas

Hotter Fields, Lower Yields

America’s reliance on fossil fuels – coal, oil, and natural gas – is fueling global warming and causing a host of other environmental, economic, and security problems.

And while the impacts vary from region to region, global warming threatens all sectors of our economy, and agriculture is no exception.
Not all the effects of global warming will be bad for agriculture; growing seasons will be longer, and increased carbon dioxide levels encourage plant growth. But global warming will make some of the challenges that agriculture faces significantly worse, including increasing temperatures, more damaging storms, ozone pollution, and spreading pests, weeds, and diseases.
This report examines the impact of global warming on corn, America’s largest crop, which is particularly vulnerable to productivity losses from the higher temperatures expected from global warming.

Report | Environment Texas

Wildcatting the Sun: A Texas Solar Roadmap

Texas has the “right stuff” to become a world leader in solar energy development – reaping the benefits of cleaner air, a robust economy and reduced dependence on fossil fuels.

Report | Environment Texas

Clean Energy, Bright Future: Rebuilding America through Green Infrastructure

Our reliance on dirty energy is fueling global warming, harming our health, threatening our security and stalling our economy. Burning coal, oil and gas for energy and transportation is responsible for 80 percent of U.S. global warming pollution and most of our smog and soot pollution.

Report | Environment Texas

Renewing America: A Blueprint for Economic Recovery

Across the country, Americans are hurting. From the big cities of the coasts to the industrial heartland to our rural communities, the slumping economy is taking its toll in shuttered businesses, disappearing jobs, bankruptcies, foreclosures and an increased sense of anxiety about our collective future.

Report | Environment Texas

Troubled Waters 2007

October 18, 2007 marks the 35th anniversary of the Clean Water Act, a landmark law intended to restore and maintain the physical, chemical and biological integrity of the nation’s waters. In passing the Clean Water Act, Congress set the goals of eliminating the discharge of pollutants into the nation’s waterways by 1985 and making all U.S. waterways fishable and swimmable by 1983. Although we have made significant progress in improving water quality since the passage of the Clean Water Act, we are far from realizing the Act’s original vision.

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