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Report | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Climate Solutions from Day One

Governors have extensive power to reduce carbon pollution and put their states on a path to clean energy – often with just a stroke of the pen. Over the last decade, governors have adopted sweeping emission reduction goals, accelerated the transition to clean energy, forged regional agreements to tackle climate change, and appointed leaders of state agencies empowered to implement policies to reduce pollution in buildings, at electric utilities, in transportation and throughout the economy.

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Solar School Tour | Emma Pabst

This past weekend I stood outside of Austin High School, waiting for guests to arrive to our tour of the schools’ rooftop solar installation. I hung our “Go Solar” banner on the closest railing I could find, pulled out the small stack of nametags I’d brought, and looked out over a parking lot packed full of cars that belonged to students and parents attending athletic practices that morning.

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Austin’s Water Forward plan is a bold step into the future

(By Jennifer Walker and Sharlene Leurig) Austin's new 100-year water plan uses an innovative strategy called integrated water resource management (also known as One Water), which looks at all sources of water — including nontraditional sources like rainwater, storm water, and wastewater — as possible resources to meet community needs. Water Forward is also the first water supply plan in Texas to incorporate climate change into its future projections.

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News Release | Environment Texas

EPA's "Dirty Water Rule" will threaten Texans' drinking water

The Dirty Water Rule would replace the 2015 Clean Water Rule, which restored federal protections to more than 143,000 miles of Texas streams, which help provide drinking water to over 11.5 million Texans. The health of Texas waterways from Rio Grande to the Red River depend on the smaller streams that feed  them, and the wetlands that filter out pollution.

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News Release | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Report: Texas should install solar on 3.2 million new homes

AUSTIN -- If builders put solar panels on the 3.2 million new homes and apartment buildings with 280,000 units expected to be built in Texas by 2045, Texas would add a projected 24,719 megawatts (MWs) of solar PV capacity, according to a new report released today by Environment Texas Research & Policy Center.  Such an effort would lead to a ten-fold increase in solar capacity and cut carbon dioxide emissions from electricity generation by 3.2% percent by 2045.

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