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Don't Dump Sewage – Reuse It | Brian Zabcik

Treated wastewater can cause pollution when it's emptied into environmentally sensitive streams, but when it's reused, it can provide a much-needed alternative source of water for landscape irrigation, agriculture, and industry. (Guest post from the "No Dumping Sewage" campaign)

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News Release

New power source in fight to stall climate change; California's 100% clean electricity bill signed into law

California Gov. Jerry Brown signed the landmark Senate Bill 100 (SB 100) today, setting the Golden State on a path to generate 100 percent of its electricity from renewable and zero-carbon sources such as solar and wind by 2045.

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News Release | Environment America

University of California system commits to 100% renewable electricity by 2025

California’s flagship public university system, with 238,000 students across 10 campuses, will run completely on electricity from clean, renewable energy by 2025, the University of California Office of the President announced today. The announcement, a first from one of the nation’s largest public university systems, builds on commitments from the UC system to mitigate climate change and meet carbon neutrality goals.

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News Release | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Report: 63% of Texas beaches had unsafe bacteria levels at least once last year

The “Swim At Your Own Risk” report revealed that Texas beaches, freshwater streams and lakes frequently contain more fecal bacteria from animal and human waste than what’s deemed safe under state law. Statewide, 63 percent of beach sites and 49 percent of freshwater sites were unsafe for swimming on at least one testing day last year. Environment Texas called for policies to prevent pollution at the source, such as green infrastructure and sewage system upgrades.

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News Release | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Report: 60 percent of testing sites at Austin waterways had unsafe bacteria at least once in 2017

AUSTIN — Austins' creeks and streams flow through city parks and along walking trails, create green space, and provide fishing spots for residents. However, a new report by Environment Texas Research and Policy Center reveals that many of these waterways tested for high levels of bacteria in 2017, and would benefit from strong measures to reduce pollution.

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