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Report | Environment Texas

Making Sense of Energy Storage

America must shift away from fossil fuels and towards clean, renewable sources of energy in order to protect our air, water and land, and to avoid the worst consequences of global warming. Renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar power, are virtually unlimited and produce little to no pollution. With renewable energy technology improving and costs plummeting, it is now possible to imagine a future in which all of America’s energy comes from clean, renewable sources. The availability of wind and solar power, however, varies by the hour, day and season.

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News Release | Environment America

Trump administration announces steps to replace EPA’s Clean Power Plan

Today, the Trump administration took its first step toward rolling back the EPA’s Clean Power Plan by announcing a move to replace this critical program that cuts power plant pollution. Environment America released the following statement in response:

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News Release | Environment Texas

70 U.S. Mayors Embrace Solar And call for Strong Policies

70 U.S. mayors, including from Austin, Buda, Universal City, and Smithville, are calling for solar energy to power their communities. A statement released today by Environment America includes mayors from cities ranging from South Miami, Fla., to Traverse City, Mich., who agree on the need to tap into clean energy from the sun.

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Report | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Flooding recommendations on oil and gas

Dear Chair Craddick and Commissioners,

We write to you today to ask the Railroad Commission of Texas to adopt new safety standards to protect the public from the dangers of crude oil and produced water spills amid flooding events.

As you may know, the Railroad Commission of Texas received at least 20 reports of spilled oil, gas, and other fluids released due to Harvey-related flooding. The spills involved thousands of barrels of oil and produced water, including some which spilled in to the Colorado River.

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